Murder Antidepressants 2011-02-10 Florida +Mother Kills Her Two Teenaged Children: Publicized On TV & In Newspapers
Summary:

This article reads:  "Seemingly inconsequential aspects of Schenecker's behavior--she started dressing like a teen-ager in torn jeans and tops that were a "little too tight" for a 50-year-old mom, exercised obsessively and was friendly but reserved-take on potential meaning when added to clues found by police in her house: two different kinds of antidepressants, a sleeping aid and a stimulant."
This highly publicized case did not appear on Google or Google News Advanced Search with any mention of antidepressants or medication for depression..  Google has changed their 'Indexing' or 'Algorithm' so that these cases do not appear under "antidepressants" or "medication +depression".  It is unknown whether Google did this accidentally or deliberately.  There is also the possibility that someone figured a way to get a virus into Google.

Today is the 10th of February.  There are four cases, counting this case, on SSRI Stories. In February of 2010 there were 63 cases on SSRI Stories and there were 61 cases in February of 2009. 

Of these four cases only two were found on Google News Advanced Search.  One was found under the keyword "Prozac" and the other was found with the keyword "Effexor". The other two were sent to SSRI Stories.  This article was sent by the Moderator & Founder of The Effexor Activist. 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Published in Peoples Magazine online [ for subscribers only] on February 21, 2011.  Reporters were Steve Helling & Amy Green in Tampa, Jeff Truesdell in St. Louis, Alexander Rocky Fleming & Wendy Grossman in Washington, D.C.

[Excerpt from article]
"They are small matters, no one of which points to a tragedy in the making.  Carpools, for instance:  Julie Schenecker, who used to be an early rise, developed a preference for making the return run from King High School. "Julis said she didn't like to get up in the morning" says one of the carpool's moms.  So most mornings Calyx, 16, prepared her own breakfast, then emerged from her family's two-story house in a gated Tampa community, her manner quiet, pleasant and "always very tense", says neighbor Tsila Abush-Kirsh. Come Pickup time, if Calyx was talking with someone, even a teacher, when Schenecker rang her cell phone, "Calyx would drop everything and rush to her mom" says David d'Albany, her former biology teacher. At school and community events, Calyx often had a parent in tow, same as the other three girls in her inner circle [dubbed the Inseparable Four]. "I had met her father, Parker, on numerous occasions but had never met Calyx's mom" says one of those mothers. "I just assumed she was busy."

I"n the wake of Schenecker's arrest on Jan. 28 for the murders of Calyx and son Beau, 13, such casual assumptions have given way to regret-filled scrutiny, as those who have known the family during their three years in Tampa wonder. "What clues did I miss?" Could I have stopped this from happening?"  "Everyone feels guilty, even though there wasn't any way to predict this," says Abush-Kirsh, a clinical psychologist who has been counseling distraught neighbors. "But there were multiple red flags that we just didn't see"  Seemingly inconsequential aspects of Schenecker's behavior--she started dresssing like a teen=agers in torn jeans and tops that were "a little too tight" for a 50-year-old mom, exercised obsessively  and was friendly but reserved--take on potential meaning when added to clues found by police in her house: two different kinds of antidepressants, a sleeping aid and a stimulant.  In addition, says a police source, "people automatially assume she was in shock when she was thaking [when cops found her after the shootings', but there was a physical condition that needed medication.  But she hand't been taking it"

"None of this squares with the energetic, even-keeled young woman people remember from her unmarried days, when she was known as Julie Powers.  "She was athletic, she was academic, she was everybody's firend," says Sylvia Carroll, who attened high school