Summary:

Paragraphs 8 & 9 read:  "“We find out there's a lot more to the investigation than simply the gun coming to school and that's what this is about,” said Shepard."

In addition to the gun, the student was carrying several pills in his backpack, some of which were the anti-depressant Zoloft; investigators believe the student was planning on selling those pills. 


http://wkrn.com/nashville/news/maury-county-student-brings-gun-to-school/135494.htm


January 8, 2008, 10:33 pm]



"Maury County Student Brings Gun To School"
Maury County investigators are looking into why a 15-year-old student had a gun in school on Tuesday. 
    
A student resource officer discovered the semi-automatic weapon in the backpack of a 10th grade Spring Hill High School student, and more charges could be on the way.

Investigators say a tip from a student alerted the school resource officer that the student had the 32-caliber semi-automatic handgun hidden in his backpack.

The gun wasn't loaded, and it's still unclear why the boy had the weapon at school. 

“At this point in time, we have no indication whatsoever that he intended to harm anyone,” said Maury County sergeant Kirk Shepard.

The sheriff's department continued its investigation Tuesday evening, saying more charges related to the incident could be coming. 

“We find out there's a lot more to the investigation than simply the gun coming to school and that's what this is about,” said Shepard.

In addition to the gun, the student was carrying several pills in his backpack, some of which were the anti-depressant Zoloft; investigators believe the student was planning on selling those pills. 

Chenelle Barnett is a freshman at Spring Hill, and said that although a gun in school is scary, “I'm not really surprised because, you know, it's high school, weapons are going to be brought to school and stuff like that. It's crazy.”

Parents like Devila Addison, who has two kids at Spring Hill, are concerned. 

“As a parent I am, because when I was going to high school none of this ever happened,” Addison said. 

Shepard says tips from students, like the one in this case, help officers do their job.

“That's the best way to make sure kids are safe, when somebody tells us and lets us know,” he said. “I think that's very important, because if you don't say anything then what's going to happen.”



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