Suicide Meds For Depression 2011-08-24 California Famous Author Iris Chang's Mother Writes Book: She Believes Cause of Iris' Suicide Was A/D Meds
Summary:

Paragraphs 8 through 11 read: ""I wanted to give support to families that suffered the same kind of loss, and it really worked in that way. Many families sent me emails after reading my book," said Chang, citing an example of a couple shocked by the suicide of their daughter, a Stanford graduate who seemed to have a bright future."

"About the suicide of her own daughter, Chang believed it was probably the side effects of psychiatric medication that led Iris to end her life."

" 'Iris used to say she never understood why people would commit suicide, so she was definitely not a suicidal type,' said Chang. 'But the side effect of psychiatric drugs changed her personality and prompted her to go that route'."

"Chang said she did some research on the psychiatric drugs and the antidepressants Iris took in the months between a temporary nervous breakdown and her suicide. She confirmed the danger of psychiatric drugs and antidepressants after reading publications by psychiatrist Peter Breggin, as well as bio-psychiatry researcher and psychiatrist Martin Teicher."


http://cupertino.patch.com/articles/iris-changs-mother-revisits-daughters-legacy-in-cupertino


Iris Chang's Mother Revisits Daughter's Legacy in Cupertino

Ying-Ying Chang, mother of the late author Iris Chang, will speak at Cupertino Community Center Aug, 27 about how a photo exhibition in Cupertino inspired her daughter to write 'The Rape of Nanking,' and what motivated Ying-Ying to write her daughter's bi Well known since its 1997 publication is the global best seller The Rape of Nanking­not so well known is that the idea for the book came to author Iris Chang while she was in Cupertino at the Quinlan Center in December 1994.

The author, who committed suicide nearly 10 years later, first saw a graphic photo exhibition of the 1937 Japanese attack on Nanking civilians, and felt an urge to publicize the almost buried atrocity to the world, according to her mother Ying-Ying Chang.

Now author of the deceased writer's biography, The Woman Who Could Not Forget, Chang is scheduled to have a book signing at Cupertino Community Center Aug. 27 from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

"It's going to be very emotional to talk about Iris in Cupertino," said Chang. "Not only because she started thinking about writing The Rape of Nanking in Cupertino, but also because she gave speeches in Cupertino many times, this book signing event in Cupertino is significant to me."

Chang, with a Ph. D. in Biological Chemistry from Harvard University, had a scientist's career until her retirement in 2002. She said she had never thought she would write a book unrelated to science, and in English, her second language, but she did.

"It's all for the sake of and in memory of my beloved daughter," Chang said. "I believe Iris in Heaven would want me to do this, to channel my sadness into something positive."

Chang said she usually gives three reasons for her unconventional decision to write her daughter's biography: to commemorate Iris, to tell Iris' son Christopher Douglas all about the mother he lost at age 2, and to set the record straight about Iris' suicide amid media speculations. She added one more reason when talking to Patch­to help those who lost loved ones like herself heal.

"I wanted to give support to families that suffered the same kind of loss, and it really worked in that way. Many families sent me emails after reading my book," said Chang, citing an example of a couple shocked by the suicide of their daughter, a Stanford graduate who seemed to have a bright future.

About the suicide of her own daughter, Chang believed it was probably the side effects of psychiatric medication that led Iris to end her life.

"Iris used to say she never understood why people would commit suicide, so she was definitely not a suicidal type," said Chang. "But the side effect of psychiatric drugs changed her personality and prompted her to go that route."

Chang said she did some research on the psychiatric drugs and the antidepressants Iris took in the months between a temporary nervous breakdown and her suicide. She confirmed the danger of psychiatric drugs and antidepressants after reading publications by psychiatrist Peter Breggin, as well as bio-psychiatry researcher and psychiatrist Martin Teicher.

"I learned from my research that medicine is not one for all," said Chang. "Iris was very sensitive. The medicine was probably not right for her."

Looking back, Chang said she thinks Iris was just a workaholic who needed a break, and should have slept more, eaten more instead of taking psychiatric drugs.

Chang said she never took any antidepressants when devastated by Iris' death.

"When I was obssessed about Iris, my husband and my son suggested taking me to see a therapist, but I said no," said Chang. "I knew writing would be more helpful to me than medicine."

Chang said she's very grateful to her husband for being extremely supportive in her writing process.

"He made breakfast for me. He reminded me to eat and to take a walk when I was writing all day, forgetting everything else," Chang said.

Another person Chang said she should thank most is Richard Rhodes, who wrote the book's introduction.

"Richard was Iris' friend," said Chang. "He immediately agreed to read my manuscript and write the introduction when I asked him."

The book with both Chang's and Rhode's names on its cover has sold more copies than expected and received postive reviews, including one in the Wall Street Journal, since its launch in May.

Chang will continue her book signing tour after the Aug. 27 event in Cupertino. Confirmed cities for the rest of this year include Menlo Park, Chicago, Washington DC, and Boston.

For reviews of the book, visit www.irischang.net/news/index.php
Related Topics: Iris Chang, Martin Teicher, Peter Breggin, Quinlan Center, The Rape of Nanking, The Woman Who Could Not Forget, Ying-Ying