Summary:

Paragraphs two through six read:  "The bizarre tale surrounding Willam Grothe's disappearance started with his car wallet and belongings were found in Shelby Park in November 2008."

"While he was missing, Metro police received a strange call from a gentleman wanting to confess to a robbery and accidentally killing the Nashville attorney.

"Both police and Grothe's family identified the caller as Grothe himself, which set off a month long search that cost taxpayers thousands of dollars."

"Prosecutors said Grothe's actions were prompted by a desire to cash in on two multimillion dollar life insurance policies, but the defense said depression was to blame, and Grothe had stopped taking his medication."

"I was feeling as badly or more than I'd ever felt in my life, and the medication wasn't stopping that, and I simply said to myself, 'If it's not helping why bother,'" Grothe testified on Friday.


http://www.wsmv.com/news/20166921/detail.html


Lawyer Sentenced To 5 Years Probation

William Grothe Found Alive After Faking Death

Reported by Sara Dorsey

POSTED: 10:37 am CDT July 24, 2009
UPDATED: 5:58 pm CDT July 24, 2009
 
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- A Nashville lawyer accused of faking his death was sentenced to five years probation on Friday.

The bizarre tale surrounding Willam Grothe's disappearance started with his car wallet and belongings were found in Shelby Park in November 2008.

While he was missing, Metro police received a strange call from a gentleman wanting to confess to a robbery and accidentally killing the Nashville attorney. clear pixel  

Both police and Grothe's family identified the caller as Grothe himself, which set off a month long search that cost taxpayers thousands of dollars.

Prosecutors said Grothe's actions were prompted by a desire to cash in on two multimillion dollar life insurance policies, but the defense said depression was to blame, and Grothe had stopped taking his medication.

"I was feeling as badly or more than I'd ever felt in my life, and the medication wasn't stopping that, and I simply said to myself, 'If it's not helping why bother,'" Grothe testified on Friday.

That's when Grothe said he began to plan and execute his escape his life.

"I didn't tell anybody of any plan to leave, not a soul. I gathered clothes form the Salvation Army and the Goodwill. I got a sleeping bag and a tent," said Grothe.

"I kissed my wife in the morning as I would always, and I called her midday, as I would always do, just to say, 'Hi,' and, 'How's the day going?' then I left went down to Shelby Park, parked my car," said Grothe.

From there, Grothe traveled west first to Montana and ultimately to Tucson, Ariz., where he lived in a tent.

"I did not make friends. I stayed alone, quite frankly. The people you find in the desert are there because of drugs alcohol or meth. Frankly they were scary people," said Grothe.

After the hearing, Grothe was sentenced to probation for five years and has to make sure he keeps taking his prescribed medication.

Grothe will also have to perform 32 hours of community service each month to help the homeless. He will also have to pay for the costs used to search for him, which equals about $13,000.

After the sentence is served, he will be able to file to have his record expunged.