Summary:

Paragraphs 1 through & 4 read: "From a Boise psychology teacher accused of having sex with a teen student to a Caldwell guardian who bore her ward's child, the Treasure Valley has seen a flurry of sex-abuse cases with female defendants."

Canyon County is prosecuting two women charged with molesting minors, and a third was sent to prison in February. In Ada County, two women have been charged with sexually abusing youths since December, the same month two others were convicted of similar crimes.

"In the past year, a dozen women have been in Valley courtrooms on charges of sexually abusing minors. They range in age from 20 to 40; their victims from 12 to 17. Each woman was at least five years older than the boy or girl."

"Local prosecutors and counselors aren't sure what to make of the apparent
increase, but they see interesting differences between male and female offenders - in the nature of the cases, in the severity of punishment and, especially, in the way the abusers and their victims are viewed by the people around them."

Second paragraph from the end reads:  "But some female abusers do get lighter sentences, she said, in part because they tend to exhibit serious emotional and psychological disorders.
Bipolar disorder, which causes hypersexuality and difficulty forging relationships with age-appropriate men, is particularly common among female sex offenders, Fisher said."

SSRI Stories Note:  Over 200,000 people a year are being hospitalized due to antidepressant induced mania & psychosis. This information is taken from "Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 2001: 62: 30-33 titled: Antidepressant-Associated Mania and Psychosis Resulting in Psychiatric Admissions  by Adrian Preda, M.D.; Rebecca W. MacLean, M.D.; Carolyn M. Mazure, Ph.D.; and Malcolm B. Bowers, Jr., M.D."

Also see:    http://www.ssristories.drugawareness.org/show.php?item=1319

Second sentence of second paragraph reads: "Without the need for an episode of hospitalization for mania, estimates of the prevalence of bipolar disorder have increased significantly from 1% in 1994, to 2.6% in 2005."

With the population of the U.S. now at 300 million, the rate of bipolar disorder has increased by 4.8 million people in the U.S. in the years from 1994 to 2005It is the opinion of SSRI Stories that the majority of this increase  has occurred because of the massive antidepressant use in this country.  People are becoming "manic" on their antidepressants and then being diagnosed as "bipolar".   

Although decreased libido is a very common side effect of SSRIs, those who become manic or hypomanic on the drug can experience an increase in libido.  This list of adverse reactions was taken from the Physicians Desk Reference for Prozac in 1998.  "Nervous System---Frequent: agitation, amnesia, confusion, emotional lability, sleep disorder; Infrequent: abnormal gait; acute brain syndrome, akathisia, apathy, ataxia, buccoglossal syndrome, CNS depression, CNS stimulation, depersonalization, euphoria, hallucinations, hostility, hyperkinesia, hypertonia, hypesthesia, incoordination,
libido increased, myoclonus, neuralgia, neuropathy, neurosis, paranoid reaction, personality disorder*, psychosis, vertigo; Rare: abnormal electroencephalogram, antisocial reaction, circumoral paresthesia, coma, delusion, dysarthria, dystonia, extrapyramidal syndrome, foot drop, hyperesthesia, neuritis, paralysis, reflexes decreased, reflexes increased, stupor."
                        
http://www.theolympian.com/northwest/story/823714.html?mi_pluck_action=comment_submitted&qwxq=871820#Comments_Container




SW Idaho seeing more women charged with sex abuse

By KRISTIN RODINE | Idaho Statesman • Published April 18, 2009

BOISE, Idaho – From a Boise psychology teacher accused of having sex with a teen student to a Caldwell guardian who bore her ward's child, the Treasure Valley has seen a flurry of sex-abuse cases with female defendants.

Canyon County is prosecuting two women charged with molesting minors, and a third was sent to prison in February. In Ada County, two women have been charged with sexually abusing youths since December, the same month two others were convicted of similar crimes.

In the past year, a dozen women have been in Valley courtrooms on charges of sexually abusing minors. They range in age from 20 to 40; their victims from 12 to 17. Each woman was at least five years older than the boy or girl.

Local prosecutors and counselors aren't sure what to make of the apparent increase, but they see interesting differences between male and female offenders - in the nature of the cases, in the severity of punishment and, especially, in the way the abusers and their victims are viewed by the people around them.

"There's an enormous public perception problem," said Jean Fisher, who prosecutes sex abuse cases for Ada County. "If the boy's under 14, people might say 'poor little fellow,' but with a 16- or 17-year-old boy, you're more likely to hear, 'Oh, man, he got lucky!'

"They don't see it as a problem. But I do. I think it's a huge problem."

Erica Kallin, a deputy prosecutor in Canyon County's Special Victims Unit, says the attitudes reflect a popular culture that tends to portray women as seductresses where men would be cast as predators.

"It's the whole 'American Pie' thing - younger guy, older mom," Kallin said. "You see it in music videos, too. It's just been ingrained in people's heads.

"And it has an adverse effect on those of us in the real world trying to protect underage victims."

Those attitudes also harm women's victims, counselor Mydell Yeager of Boise said.

"If the people around are reacting, 'You're lucky,' it makes it harder for them to come forward," Yeager said. "And it makes it harder in treatment."


Preconceptions about women also can make it less likely for people to suspect the offender and protect the victim, Yeager said: "We still have difficulty believing that it's possible."













Related Stories & Links