Emotional Turmoil Antidepressant Withdrawal 2011-07-28 New York Writer Sends Out Letters He Later Regrets Sending
Summary:

Paragraph nine reads: "And though the one single review was a singularly dishonest hatchet job, not mentioning the author's contrite regrets for letters that were sent out in moments of passion, and often as a result of withdrawal effects from antidepressants or tranquilizers, the book is full of moments of humility and self-deprecation. What is also true: the author's connection with Sonny Mehta continued for over a year, and included a lunch, and two visits to his home. And that Tim O'Brien was the father of the title­choosing it from a list of three."


http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/rights/display.cgi?no=7779


THE KILLING OF AN AUTHOR: A Story of Freedom, An American Dream, and a Failure of Cojones
July 28, 2011
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Author: Richard Crasta
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Category: Non-fiction: General/Other
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Description: Did Sonny Mehta really ask for a piece of Richard Crasta's fish, and is there one publisher in the Land of the Free with the big heart and the big cojones to publish one of the most daring books ever written by a writer--ever, ever?

Which word did David Davidar want out of "The Revised Kama Sutra"? Who did Harriet Wasserman think of as a possible producer for Crasta's novel, after saying, "I can see it as a move." Why was the author surprised that John Irving did not descend onto Breadloaf via a helicopter?

The juicy "The Killing of an Author" is full of factual and memorable details of publishing, writers, and editors, many of whom are famous names.

It is also a book that India's senior journalist Kuldip Nayar described as a work of integrity.

Integrity had nothing to do with the only American review of the book, of which only a few copies entered the U.S.

It is possible to own and sample this book from Amazon Kindle for next to nothing; it is presently up at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003WQAX4M for less than the price of a modest hamburger.

But more than that, is there a publisher in America that has the cojones and heart to publish this book, with a real editor, real physical books, and real distribution?

Because, in addition to juicy details, it also contains some fundamental questions about publishing­that authors and writers need to discuss.

And though the one single review was a singularly dishonest hatchet job, not mentioning the author's contrite regrets for letters that were sent out in moments of passion, and often as a result of withdrawal effects from antidepressants or tranquilizers, the book is full of moments of humility and self-deprecation.
What is also true: the author's connection with Sonny Mehta continued for over a year, and included a lunch, and two visits to his home. And that Tim O'Brien was the father of the title­choosing it from a list of three.

On the one hand, The Killing of an Author is an exhaustive list of mistakes a writer should never make; on the other hand, it is an Encyclopedia of the Dark side of publishing world. Many a reader has reported that they read the book nonstop; because it has an element of literary thriller to it.

"What comes out is his integrity. Not many people about whom you can say this. If Richard succeeds, we shall all succeed."--Kuldip Nayar, eminent Indian author/editor/statesman.

"Dares to be different . . . a sense of humor from the start to the end."--The Deccan Chronicle

What does the System do to the rebellious author who won't play by the rules, especially if this author comes from a former slave country? What are the unwritten Taboos? This is a 70,000 word memoir, serious and sometimes laugh-out-loud, of an ambitious, daring author who challenges the top editors of America's big publishing houses to be more humane, considerate, fair, balanced, and compassionate. Who meets John Irving and starts a correspondence with him. Whose novel excerpts charm National Book Award winner Tim O'Brien, resulting in his becoming a client of Harriet Wasserman, Saul Bellow's agent.

Richard Crasta starts this book by admitting to the reader that he F****d up, that he was brash, silly, over-emotional, overconfident, stressed. And that he was indeed taking a variety of psychiatric medications--some prescribed by his wife--that made him moody and tempestuous.

And yet, finally, he does make it big in India, for a short while, gets a phenomenal reception for his novel there . . . and then, things start to fall apart.

There are lots of twists and turns in this book: Columbia University, writing at home while looking after his children, writers' conferences such as Breadloaf, dancing with Robert Bly, the Pope of the Men's Movement. Lunch with Sonny Mehta. But Sonny wants the book edited, and then simply doesn't answer specific questions, neither rejecting or accepting the book, keeping him on tenterhooks for over a year.

On the one hand, The Killing of an Author is an exhaustive list of mistakes a writer should never make; on the other hand, it is an Encyclopedia of the Dark side of publishing world. Many a reader has reported that they read the book nonstop; because it has an element of literary thriller to it.

"What comes out is his integrity. Not many people about whom you can say this. If Richard succeeds, we shall all succeed."--Kuldip Nayar, eminent Indian author/editor/statesman.

"Dares to be different . . . a sense of humor from the start to the end."--The Deccan Chronicle

"You are funny and delightful . . . and nowhere are you too heavy to carry. I've never read anyone like you. I laugh, I ache, I smile, I cry - but never close the book without that smile surfacing."--Sheelagh Grenon, Canada

About 70,000 words.
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Rights available: All
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Other information: By the author of "I WILL NOT GO THE F**K TO SLEEP" a political humor bestseller on Kindle, and THE REVISED KAMA SUTRA--A NOVEL published in 10 countries.
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[] Contact: Richard Crasta
richard.crasta@gmail.com
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Item number: 7779