Summary:

Paragraph nine reads:  "According to court records, Ahumada confessed to her roommate in November that she molested the boy. The roommate told her counselor, who reported the abuse. When the roommate told Ahumada she had been reported, she overdosed on prescription medication, police said. Investigators reported that both of Ahumada's arms were covered in scars "from cutting, burns and other self-abuse."

SSRI Stories has confirmed that this woman was being treated for depression and taking medication for her diagnosis.

Also, in regard to the cutting, burns and other self-abuse this woman inflicted on herself, the Boston Globe on May 7, 2000 had this to say, "  "The patent for the new Prozac or R-fluoxetine (US Patent no. 5,708,035), which Lilly will market after the existing patent expires in 2001, contains a wealth of information about the original Prozac. According to the patent, the new Prozac will decrease side effects of the existing Prozac such as headaches, nervousness, anxiety, and insomnia, as well as "inner restlessness (akathisia), suicidal thoughts and self-mutilation" - the same effect Lilly has contended has not occurred in any substantial way in some 200 lawsuits against it over the past decade. Most of the suits were settled out of court and the terms kept confidential."

The new Prozac was never marketed.

http://www.idahostatesman.com/102/story/855049.html

Notus woman gets prison term for molesting 12-year-old boy
Sentenced to up to 7 years, Esmeralda Ahumada could be on probation next year after treatment.
BY KRISTIN RODINE - krodine@idahostatesman.com
Copyright: © 2009 Idaho Statesman
Published: 08/04/09


'In a Canyon County courtroom Monday, lawyers and a judge wrapped up a case in which both victim and criminal have lifetimes filled with abuse.

Esmeralda Ahumada, 21, sobbed through her much of her sentencing hearing, saying, "I hate myself for what I did." She has admitted repeated sexual contact with her roommate's 12-year-old son at their Notus home while the roommate was in the hospital last fall.

The boy's mother gave a victim impact statement but spent much more time speaking favorably of Ahumada than she spent talking about the impact on her son, who is in counseling. She said she is "torn between them" but stressed she does not choose Ahumada over her son.

"He has his own issues from a lifetime of abuse," the mother said, adding that the boy had been sexually abused and burned with cigarettes as a child. "It's difficult to tell what effect Essie has had on him because it's all run together."

She urged the judge not to send Ahumada to prison, saying her friend is trying to change and already is beginning to make better choices in her life. For example, she said, rather than attempting suicide as she has five times in the past, Ahumada this spring checked herself in to a hospital mental ward when suicidal feelings came on.

"I do want change in my life because I realize what I do hurts the people I love and care about," Ahumada said. "I want to love and care about myself, too."

Third District Judge Renae Hoff sentenced Ahumada to three to seven years in prison for felony injury to a child. But she retained jurisdiction and will revisit the case after Ahumada has had about six months of treatment in the Department of Corrections mental health unit in Pocatello. If Hoff receives a favorable report, she could consider the defense recommendation that Ahumada receive probation and community-based treatment for her mental health, drug and sex abuse issues.

Hoff ordered Ahumada to have no contact with her victim and no unsupervised contact with minors.

According to court records, Ahumada confessed to her roommate in November that she molested the boy. The roommate told her counselor, who reported the abuse. When the roommate told Ahumada she had been reported, she overdosed on prescription medication, police said. Investigators reported that both of Ahumada's arms were covered in scars "from cutting, burns and other self-abuse."

She was initially charged with lewd conduct but pleaded guilty this spring to the reduced charge of felony injury to a child.

Ahumada is on several medications for depression and mood stabilization, public defender Lance Fusting said.

"There is an incredibly long history of sexual abuse she has had to endure from the age of 3 to the age of 20 at the hands of different men who were having relationships with other family members," Fusting said. "It's my impression that given her horrible upbringing she needs some opportunity to discover what normal is."

Deputy Canyon County Prosecutor Erica Kallin acknowledged that Ahumada had a rough life, "but it does not excuse her behavior.

"What she did, not only is it illegal, but it's just plain wrong," Kallin said. "Whether he was a willing participant or not, she was the adult. ... She preyed upon his innocence, his immaturity and his inability to understand what was wrong."

Kristin Rodine: 377-6447