Summary:

Paragraphs 20 & 21 read: "Douglas Jensen started to become agitated and asked for his depression medication which was inside the house.

"Sergeant McNaughton said Douglas Jensen was taken to the police station to be spoken to by detectives but she did not know if he received his medication."

http://the.standard.net.au/articles/2005/02/01/1107020361179.html

A TARRINGTON man charged with murdering his father was passionate about firearms, a Warrnambool court was told yesterday.

Douglas Victor Jensen, 39, of West Schultz Road, appeared in the Warrnambool Magistrates Court yesterday for the first day of a committal hearing.

Marius Kristian Jensen was found dead in his home from a gunshot wound on February 2, 2000.

The court was told yesterday that police attended the Sunnyside property near Tarrington, a few kilometres east of Hamilton, on February 2 and found Marius Jensen dead on the kitchen floor, lying on his back with a gunshot wound to the right side of his head.

A pool of blood was near his head and a gun was found close by.


Colin Ian Sinclair, one of two men who met Douglas Jensen in the Hamilton Army Reserve about 1985, said the accused appeared fascinated with guns.

Both told the court that Jensen had a passion for firearms but it was not unusual for people to become so interested in guns.

Sergeant Paul Goodwin, of Hamilton police, said he was the station's section sergeant on the day of the incident.

He received a radio call that there was a deceased person at[fi] Sunnyside[f%] and immediately thought it was suspicious.

Before he got to the scene, he knew that Douglas Jensen had reported his father had shot himself, Sergeant Goodwin said.

He thought the death was suspicious because he knew Marius Jensen was afraid of his sons and afraid they might take his life at some stage.

Sergeant Goodwin told the court he treated the home as a crime scene and went inside to see the dead man's body.

Douglas Jensen was later taken to Hamilton police station to be interviewed by detectives, Sergeant Goodwin told the court.

Sergeant Kelly McNaughton, of Oakley police, also gave evidence yesterday.

She said Douglas Jensen was shaking, crying and distraught at the police station where he reported his father's death.

"It appeared a normal reaction to someone who had come across a relative who was deceased," she said.

She said Douglas Jensen accompanied her to the farm and found the dead man lying on the floor next to the kitchen table.

It was dark and she did not see a weapon.

Douglas Jensen started to become agitated and asked for his depression medication which was inside the house.

Sergeant McNaughton said Douglas Jensen was taken to the police station to be spoken to by detectives but she did not know if he received his medication.

Douglas Jensen's brother Colin said yesterday that after his mother died his father became very quiet.

His father had no other interests except his bees which were his whole life.

About 18 months before his father's death, his father thought his bees might have a disease which would wipe them out, Mr Jensen said.

He told his father to segregate the sick bees but did not think his father had done anything about it.

The dead man's niece, Annette Yates, said she used to see her uncle about once a month and at times he was wary about his sons.

He felt that Douglas had a bad temper and it would get him into trouble at some time, she said.

There were arguments in the house and her uncle was apprehensive and scared of the boys, Mrs Yates said.

He always talked about his bees which he loved, she said.

The committal is being heard before Magistrate Peter Mealy and will continue today.