Summary:

Second paragraph reads:  "For over a month, the counseling seemed to help. Then his psychiatrist prescribed Prozac, which made him overactive, and he became a danger to himself and to us. He was hospitalized and taken off that medication. He returned home with a better outlook and seemed to be improving. Now he has decided not to continue counseling and refuses to take other medicine. He is lonely and tends to blame all his shortcomings on us."

http://www.creators.com/lifestylefeatures/annies-mailbox/annie-s-mailbox-r-2007-05-18.html


Annie's Mailbox®, May 18

Dear Annie: Our 23-year-old son has lots of emotional problems and has been diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder. For five years, he saw a psychiatrist for a chemical imbalance. He became frustrated and refused to continue his therapy. Within a few months, he dropped out of college and later quit a good job. We next employed the services of a clinical psychologist and another psychiatrist.

For over a month, the counseling seemed to help. Then his psychiatrist prescribed Prozac, which made him overactive, and he became a danger to himself and to us. He was hospitalized and taken off that medication. He returned home with a better outlook and seemed to be improving. Now he has decided not to continue counseling and refuses to take other medicine. He is lonely and tends to blame all his shortcomings on us.

We are hoping you can suggest alternatives to deal with this disorder and what additional aid we can get. ­ Struggling Parents in Virginia

Dear Parents: First, understand that your son is an adult and there is only so much you can do. Your goal should be for him to be able to hold down a job and live independently. Studies show that regular exercise can have a positive effect on the brain, so consider getting him a gym membership or a bike for his next birthday. It's something your son may be willing to do for his general health. Also contact the Obsessive-Compulsive Foundation (ocfoundation.org), 676 State St., New Haven, CT 06511, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (nami.org) at 1-800-950-NAMI (1-800-950-6264).