Murder Med For Depression 2010-06-24 Virginia Woman Runs Her Car Into Another Woman: Charged With First-Degree Murder

http://www.ssristories.com/show.php?item=4308

Summary:

Paragraph one reads:  "Chad Dooley, Kimberly Eide's boyfriend, said she had begun taking a new depression medication before the incident.:
 
Paragraph seven reads:  "Eide has suffered depression, migraine headaches, irritable bowel syndrome and other ailments for years, said Dooley, her boyfriend of three years. She recently had begun taking a new medicine for depression."



http://www.roanoke.com/news/roanoke/wb/251195

Pill fight, SUV fatal for best friend in El Rodeo parking lot


The week before Kimberly Eide struck Tara Rooksberry-Tyree with her SUV, Eide was charged with being drunk in public.

By Amanda Codispoti | amanda.codispoti@roanoke.com | 981-3334


ERIC BRADY The Roanoke Times

Chad Dooley, Kimberly Eide's boyfriend, said she had begun taking a new depression medication before the incident.

Kimberly Eide woke from a 24-hour drinking binge in jail, unsure what she had done.

Her boyfriend broke the news in a phone call: Eide, 40, had driven her Dodge Durango into her 20-year-old son and her best friend in the parking lot of a Roanoke County Mexican restaurant where the three had lunched. There had been margaritas, tequila shots and an argument over pain pills. Things got out of control.

Eide, locked in the Roanoke County-Salem Jail, remembered none of it, said her boyfriend, Chad Dooley.

"I think it was just an accident," said Eide's son, Donovan Winland, who wasn't seriously hurt. "I don't even think she knew she hit anybody."

Three days later, the news worsened. Eide's friend, Tara Rooksberry-Tyree, 28, died without regaining consciousness after she was run down by the SUV in the parking lot of the El Rodeo restaurant on Electric Road. First-degree murder was added to charges of driving under the influence, refusing a breath test and resisting arrest.

Eide has suffered depression, migraine headaches, irritable bowel syndrome and other ailments for years, said Dooley, her boyfriend of three years. She recently had begun taking a new medicine for depression.

Dooley and Winland said they blame the pharmaceutical cocktail, along with drinking and lack of sleep, for Eide's troubles.

Tara Rooksberry-Tyree, 28, died after she was run down by the SUV in the parking lot of the El Rodeo restaurant on Electric Road in Southwest Roanoke County.

The week before the restaurant clash, Eide landed in Botetourt-Craig County regional jail. She called Botetourt County sheriff's deputies to her trailer at Hollins Mobile Home Park on April 27 to arrest Dooley. He said he'd been sleeping while Eide partied next door on white Russian cocktails. She came home and called the sheriff because she wanted Dooley arrested.

Deputies told her they had no reason to arrest Dooley and started to leave.

Eide followed them outside, complaining, and ignored deputies' warnings to return to the trailer, Botetourt County Commonwealth's Attorney Joel Branscom said.

The deputies charged her with being drunk in public. When they placed her in the back seat of the patrol car, she kicked the seats and doors and nearly booted a deputy in the face, Branscom said.

Eide awoke in jail with no memory of the clash, Dooley said.

"She'd blacked out that time, too," he said.

A week later, Eide was free on bail. Winland suggested that he take Eide out for an early Mother's Day lunch. Rooksberry-Tyree came along.

The two women had been up drinking all night, and into the afternoon, Winland said.

They drank margaritas during lunch at El Rodeo. Before leaving, each took a shot of tequila, Winland said.

Their lack of sleep, and their drinking, made both irritable and they argued about getting more pain pills, he said.

The three piled into Eide's silver SUV, with Winland at the wheel, Eide in the front passenger's seat, and Rooksberry-Tyree in the back. Eide turned around to grab Rooksberry-Tyree's purse, setting off another fight.

The women got out of the vehicle, yelling at each other. Other witnesses told police they swung purses at each other, according to a search warrant filed in the case. Rooksberry-Tyree finally pushed Eide away and walked back toward the restaurant, saying she'd find another ride home, Winland said.

Winland said he got out of the SUV to try to persuade her to reconsider.

That's when he heard the engine rev, he said.

Eide hit two vehicles as she pulled out of the parking spot, Winland said.

The Durango came straight at them, knocking Rooksberry-Tyree into the air. She landed facedown on the pavement. Winland said he was thrown against a curb and suffered a scrape.

In the search warrant, police wrote that Eide "aimed the vehicle at the victim and male companion and deliberately struck" them.

Eide sped away from the restaurant. Police arrested her about 20 minutes later as the SUV entered Interstate 81 from I-581.

Winland said he ran to help Rooksberry-Tyree.

"I got up and saw blood everywhere," Winland said.

Rooksberry-Tyree wasn't talking, but she was breathing, he said. She died three days later at Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital.

Dooley said he and Rooksberry-Tyree attended Lord Botetourt High School together. As a teenager, she dated Dooley's brother.

A few years ago, Dooley and Eide moved into a house in Northeast Roanoke. Rooksberry-Tyree, it happened, lived next door. In the past six or eight months, the two women began spending time together, said Rooksberry-Tyree's family.

Rooksberry-Tyree had separated from her second husband, said her father, Richard Koch, and needed someone to lean on.

The women spent hours together, Dooley said. Rooksberry-Tyree would bring her 10-year-old daughter to Eide's house to play with her young son while the women watched "Desperate Housewives," Dooley said.

"They were always together," Winland said. "They were inseparable."

Rooksberry-Tyree also began dating Dooley's brother again.

Her older sister, Lauren Galvan, said Rooksberry-Tyree was frightened of Eide. Galvan said her sister and Eide weren't friends.

"My sister would tell me over and over again every time she came to my house how afraid she was of Kimberly," Galvan said.

"She realized how dangerous Kimberly was, but she didn't know what to do," Koch said.

Rooksberry-Tyree had a pain pill prescription for a back injury, Koch said, and Eide used her to get the drugs.

"Kim wanted Tara's prescription pain pills, and when Tara said no, that's when Kim exploded," Koch said.