Violence Antidepressants 2010-07-22 Australia Woman Attacks Paramedic: No Alcohol Involved

http://www.ssristories.com/show.php?item=4375

Summary:

Paragraph 16 reads:  "Solicitor Cathy Krieg, of McKays Solicitors, said Fischer was on anti-depressants and had not consumed alcohol for a long time before the night of the incident."

Paragraph 1 reads:  "Caitlin Fischer – who had been on medication and had not drunk alcohol for some time – headbutted an ambulance officer who was trying to help her."


http://www.dailymercury.com.au/story/2010/07/23/woman-headbutts-paramedic-caitlin-fischer-hospital/


Woman headbutts paramedic

Bruce Mckean | 23rd July 2010

Caitlin Fischer – who had been on medication and had not drunk alcohol for some time – headbutted an ambulance officer who was trying to help her.

MACKAY woman Caitlin Fischer headbutted an ambulance officer who took her to hospital after she was found unconscious in a nightclub precinct in Fortitude Valley in Brisbane.

The assault prompted Magistrate Damien Dwyer to warn that any assaults on emergency service workers would not be tolerated.

“Members of the emergency services have to be protected,” Mr Dwyer said.

“It must get through to the community that people cannot go out and get drunk and be given help by emergency workers and then go and assault the people who are trying to help them.

“The courts will support them,” Mr Dwyer said.

“This sort of behaviour is simply not on.”

Fischer, a 21-year-old university student, was found unconscious in Fortitude Valley at 2.25am and was taken by a 26-year-old ambulance officer to the Royal Brisbane Hospital, prosecutor Senior Constable Wayne Smith told the Mackay Magistrate’s Court.

The ambulance officer had treated her in Fortitude Valley, placed her on a stretcher, put a safety belt around her, and took her to triage at the hospital.

She became conscious and tried to get up and undo the safety belt.

He thought she was going to fall out onto the floor so he went to support her.

She headbutted him and started screaming and yelling.

The ambulance officer suffered discomfort and pain but was not seriously injured.

Security staff were called and she had to be restrained.

Fischer pleaded guilty to common assault.

Solicitor Cathy Krieg, of McKays Solicitors, said Fischer was on anti-depressants and had not consumed alcohol for a long time before the night of the incident.

She was remorseful and had assisted police with their inquiries.

“As soon as she realised she was wanted by police she went to the Mackay police station on July 14 and made a full statement,” Ms Krieg said.

Fischer was now off medication and was continuing medical treatment and her studies.

Magistrate Dwyer said he accepted the assault was out of character for Fischer but he told her: “What you do when you’re drunk, you pay for when you’re sober.”

Fischer was fined $1000 and was ordered to pay $750 compensation to the ambulance officer.