Assault Med For Depression 2010-04-26 England School Teacher Attacks Pupil with Bar Bell: Seriously Injures 14 Year Old

http://web.archive.org/web/20130202073030/http://ssristories.com/show.php?item=4154

Summary:

Paragraphs 10 and 11 read:  "He said Harvey had been a teacher at the secondary school for 16 years but his career had been disrupted in December 2008 when he told an education advisor he felt his actions "could not be trusted and he might cause harm to someone".

"The prosecutor said: "As a result of that, not surprisingly, he was sent home that day and later saw a doctor. Because of stress and depression he was away from school for sometime."

Paragraphs 33 & 34 read:  "He had told a colleague he had been 'very tired for a year and had become very negative and snappy. He said he had twice before lost his temper, once in a  'real rage', reducing a girl to tears."

"He had been prescribed medication, was wary of crowds and if someone had looked at him in a certain way had wanted to 'gouge out their eyes'. "


http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/2948402/Teacher-attacked-pupil-and-yelled-Die-die-die.html?OTC-RSS&ATTR=News


SSir hit pupil and yelled: Die, die, die

By ANDREW PARKER

Published: 26 Apr 2010

A STRESSED teacher tried to kill a pupil with a dumbbell and screamed "Die die die" after teenagers in a physics lesson deliberately tried to provoke him, a court heard today.

Cheeky kids in his class secretly filmed themselves baiting science master Peter Harvey who "cracked" under the provocation and attacked the 14-year-old who had told him to "F*** Off".

The teenage victim, who cannot be named for legal reasons, suffered a fractured skull and bleeding to the brain after being struck around the head with the 3kg science lab weight.

He spent five days in hospital recovering from his injuries

A court heard today father-of-two Harvey told police after his arrest he believed he had "killed the boy".

Tragedies

A jury was told the attack happened at All Saints Roman Catholic School in Mansfield, Notts, shortly after Harvey had returned to work following time off for stress.

Prosecutor Stuart Rafferty QC said: "Most of us look back at our school days as the happiest and best times of our lives.

"That, most simply, won't be the case for this 14-year-old boy. That is one of the tragedies of this case."

He said Harvey had been a teacher at the secondary school for 16 years but his career had been disrupted in December 2008 when he told an education advisor he felt his actions "could not be trusted and he might cause harm to someone".

The prosecutor said: "As a result of that, not surprisingly, he was sent home that day and later saw a doctor. Because of stress and depression he was away from school for sometime.

"In April the following year he was back at work. He appeared happy and well and had been teaching for some time with his previous symptoms, if not gone, under control."

Mr Rafferty said the attack occurred during the second period of the day while Harvey was taking a science lesson for Year 9 pupils aged 13-14 years.

He told Nottingham crown court: "Some of the pupils regarded him as a soft touch and tried to push the boundaries with him, but that does not justify what was to happen.

"One of the pupils had behavioural problems, she was disruptive in class and was messing about with a white board and blinds.

"Harvey pulled her away from the windows, grabbing her bag which was on her shoulder, and allegedly kicking her leg.

She left the classroom in a state of anger and her eyes full of tears. Some of the class took exception to what had happened and told Harvey he was a 'Psycho', although he did not appear to respond to that remark.

"Then the victim took up a wooden metre rule and began a sword fight with it. He then took up a metal Bunsen burner stand and was waving it about.

"Harvey chased him around the classroom, then the boy told him to 'F*** off'. That lit the blue touch paper.

"In a general description, he went mad, grabbed the boy by the collar and dragged him out of the classroom. At no stage was the boy violent towards Harvey.

"You would have thought, having got the boy out of the class, the incident may have come to an end, but I'm afraid it did not, because Harvey dragged the boy across the room, across the corridor and into a preparation room.

"He threw him to the ground and having armed himself with a 3kg dumbbell kept in there, began to hit the boy about the head. He struck him at least two blows and dealt him serious injury.

"At the time, or very shortly after, he was heard to say, the only thing he was to say throughout this scene, 'Die, die, die!'"

The court heard Harvey was kneeling over the boy, raining blows with the weight from shoulder height.

The prosecutor added: "We say there is no doubt at all that the dumbbell was being used as a potential lethal weapon."

The jury heard another boy pupil tried to drag the teacher away, but Harvey's response was to hurl the weight at him, just missing the lad.

The court was shown footage secretly filmed by a girl pupil, with the class baiting Harvey minutes before he snapped and lost his temper.

He is heard shouting at pupils and the children can clearly be heard giggling and one commented: "He's being a bit of a psycho."

Footage from the school's CCTV showed Harvey dragging the boy across the corridor into the side room while other pupils ran from the scene. It also showed him leaving the room with his fists clenched.

The victim was found lying on the floor by a fellow teacher with "a gaping and heavily bleeding wound". His scalp was visible and he was bleeding from his right ear.
The court was told the prosecution accept that while Harvey was "deliberately provoked" that was insufficient to mitigate the serious charges he faces.

Harvey admitted at that stage he thought the boy was dead.

The jury heard the teacher first became stressed two or three years earlier when he pushed a pupil who was abusing a teacher into a bush.

He had told a colleague he had been "very tired for a year" and had become very negative and snappy. He said he had twice before lost his temper, once in a "real rage", reducing a girl to tears.

He had been prescribed medication, was wary of crowds and if someone had looked at him in a certain way had wanted to "gouge out their eyes".

A girl pupil who witnessed the attack said Harvey had "snapped" when the 14-year-old boy told him to "F*** off".

In an interview the girl, who is now 15, said: "I saw him go for the weight, lift it upwards and hit him over the head.

"It was hard enough for blood to come out. There was blood everywhere."

She said boys in the class had played "volleyball" with rolled up pieces of paper in a deliberate attempt to provoke the under pressure teacher.

She said the class was "in uproar" after the girl Harvey had ordered out of the classroom had called him a "bald headed bastard".

Asked by Rex Tedd, QC, defending, if they had all thought it "was jolly good fun" the girl replied: "Yes".

She admitted the class had deliberately tried to "antagonise" Harvey after he reduced their fellow pupil to tears.

She said: "She was crying and walking out, she shouted 'You bald headed bastard!'

"I asked him why he had done it, he said because 'You are all annoying'. I told him I thought he was having a mental breakdown."

She said Harvey was "generally liked as a person", but he was unable to control a classroom since he had come back to school after illness.

As a result she admitted pupils had "taken advantage of him" and filmed him "once or twice" while misbehaving in the hope he would lose his temper.

Later the girl whose behaviour had first attracted the teacher's wrath told the court Harvey was "always a bit weird" and was always singing or talking to himself.

She claimed that when Harvey grabbed her bag to pull her out of classroom he had kicked her four times before ordering her out of the class.

The prosecution has previously accepted that Harvey was "of impeccable previous good character".

Harvey denies the attempted murder in July last year and causing the pupil grievous bodily harm with intent. But admits the lesser charge of causing grievous bodily harm.

The trial continues.