Summary:

Paragraph 7 reads; "Desnoyers had problems with depression during the past four years and was taking medication. Desnoyers has taught second grade for 24 years. Langlois is an accountant."

http://lfpress.ca/newsstand/News/National/2006/08/19/1764829-sun.html

NORTH HERO, VT. -- A Montreal woman pleaded not guilty yesterday to drowning her eight-year-old son in Lake Champlain and was sent to the state hospital for an evaluation of whether she's capable of standing trial.

Louise Desnoyers, 48, was taken into the Grand Isle County Courthouse in a wheelchair wearing a hospital gown after being treated for injuries she suffered when she allegedly tried to kill herself after her son, Nicholas Desnoyers-Langlois, died.

She sobbed with her head down as she sat in the courtroom for five minutes waiting for Judge A. Gregory Rainville to preside over her arraignment on a charge of first-degree murder. Her son's father, Real Langlois, sat in the back of the courtroom, also crying as he watched her intently. A family lawyer said the couple had never married, although they lived together for 30 years.

"He was here to support her," Montreal lawyer Jean-Pierre Rancurt said through an interpreter.

An interpreter also translated the court proceedings into French for Desnoyers and the family.

Desnoyers has told police that she held her son underwater until he died so he would not have to suffer through the divorce that she expected. Langlois, who angrily told photographers not to take his picture, refused to talk to reporters.

Rancurt said the couple had discussed a separation on Monday, the same day that Desnoyers disappeared with their youngest son. They also have a 15-year-old son. Rancurt said Desnoyers had problems with depression during the past four years and was taking medication. Desnoyers has taught second grade for 24 years. Langlois is an accountant.

Vermont State Police Detective James Claremont, who said Langlois and two of Desnoyers' brothers were turned away from visiting her in the hospital, said it was difficult to understand Langlois' emotions.

"I don't have a good sense whether he was angry or sad," Claremont said. "He's devastated."