Summary:

Paragraph three reads:  "But she was spared jail and given a 12-month conditional discharge after the court heard it was her first offence and “wholly out of character”.

Paragraph eleven reads:  "Young was arrested on July 23 and in police interview she said she had been drinking on the night of the offence and was taking anti-depressants."

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that
antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.  Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.  



http://www.thisissouthwales.co.uk/southwalesnews/Mobile-phone-row-ended-face-glassing/article-1662521-detail/article.html



Mobile phone row ended in face glassing

Thursday, December 31, 2009, 20:00

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A MUM-OF-TWO glassed her former brother-in-law in the face after an argument in a pub over her mobile phone.

Margaret Young, aged 47, of Faraday Road, Clydach, admitted unlawful wounding when she appeared at Swansea Crown Court.

But she was spared jail and given a 12-month conditional discharge after the court heard it was her first offence and “wholly out of character”.

The incident happened at about 11.45pm on June 20 in the Three Compasses pub in Clydach.

Frank Phillips, prosecuting, said Young and the complainant, her former brother-in-law Adrian Young, had argued because she thought he had taken her mobile phone.

Mr Young let her search him, before going to the toilet. On his return she swore at him and called him a “thug”.

Mr Phillips said the dispute continued and Young threw ice at him, before throwing a half  pint glass “with such force that it smashed on impact in his face”.

The court heard the glass hit Mr Young’s nose and cut his upper lip.

“Since the incident he’s been in a state of shock and cannot go back to the public house,” said Mr Phillips.

Mr Young needed three butterfly stitches in his upper lip.

Young was arrested on July 23 and in police interview she said she had been drinking on the night of the offence and was taking anti-depressants.

“She said she remembered seeing blood on his face,” said Mr Phillips.

“She said she thought she’d thrown the glass in temper. She said she hadn’t meant to hurt him.”

Defence barrister Kevin Riordan said Mr Young was of a “robust personality” and “thankfully was not badly injured”.

“There had been incidents between this defendant and the complainant in the past,” he said.

“But in fairness to her, she said most times they had been fairly civil to each other.”

Mr Riordan said Young had been subject to “some degree of provocation”.

The court heard Young, who works for the DVLA has no previous convictions.

Judge Huw Davies, QC, sentencing, said that “very often” somebody who had committed an offence involving “glassing” could expect a jail sentence.

“Your case is a very untypical one,” he said.

“I believe what you did that night was wholly out of character.”

Young was given a 12- month conditional discharge and must pay £300 costs.

julia.bosnyak@swwmedia.co.uk