Summary:

Second & Third paragraphs from the end read: "John Scott, defending, said Aitken, who he called a "quiet, hard-working, family man" was examined after his arrest but no signs of acute psychiatric illness were found."

"Aitken blamed the drug Seroxat [Paxil] for the episode but an expert said he had been taking the anti-depressant for some time without complications."

Paragraph 7 reads: "The High Court in Edinburgh heard how in February the father-of-two, who was taking anti-depressants, had four drinks at a family function with his wife Mandy."

Mixing alcohol with antidepressants is an extremely dangerous practice and could be the trigger for this horrendous incident.

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/tm_objectid=17630307&method=full&siteid=66633&headline=chainsaw-hell-name_page.html

CHAINSAW HELL
Family flee in terror as neighbour runs amok and cuts through doors
By Brian Horne

A GARDENER terrorised his neighbours when he ran amok with a chainsaw.

James Aitken, 33, sawed his way through doors and furniture as the terrified family barricaded themselves in a bedroom.

And he doused police with petrol before threatening to set fire to them.

Yesterday, Aitken admitted vandalism, culpable and reckless conduct, breach of the peace and assault.

Judge Lord Brodie described the events as "bizarre and irrational".

The High Court in Edinburgh heard how in February the father-of-two, who was taking anti-depressants, had four drinks at a family function with his wife Mandy.

After returning to their home in Whitecraig, East Lothian, Mandy spotted her husband smoking and taking items from his car boot.

When he began acting strangely and refused to return to the house, she ran to her parents' house nearby and called the police.

Aitken's father-in-law James Keenan went outside to see him holding a running chainsaw above his head and saying he was looking for his wife.

Keenan later told police: "He looked as if he was on another planet."

Alex Prentice, prosecuting, said Aitken threw a slab through a neighbour's window, where two children - aged 11 and eight - were asleep in their bunk beds.

Their parents rushed into the room to find the bed covered with broken glass.

Aitken was seen cutting the mirror from a van before sawing his way through a downstairs window shouting: "Mandy, Mandy, Mandy."

The family barricaded themselves in the bedroom by placing a football table and punch bag across the door.

Mr Prentice added: "They were terrified that the accused was going to kill them."

Aitken then swung his chainsaw at a police car as it pulled up and set fire to a Ford Transit.

PC John Neilands was splashed on the arms and legs as Aitken threw petrol at him and threatened to spark his lighter.

The court heard he then sprayed petrol from a can into PC Gordon Millar's face before the officers subdued him.

PC Millar was treated for the irritation to his eyes and PC Neilands suffered irritation to his legs.

After his arrest, Aitken was taken to hospital where he began to bite his wrists and bang his head against a wall.

John Scott, defending, said Aitken, who he called a "quiet, hard-working, family man" was examined after his arrest but no signs of acute psychiatric illness were found.

Aitken blamed the drug Seroxat for the episode but an expert said he had been taking the anti-depressant for some time without complications.

He was remanded in custody and will be sentenced at a later date.