Death Med For Depression 2010-05-24 England 30 Year Old Mother Felt Unwell on Depression Med: Dies at Home
Summary:

Paragraphs 6 through 8 read:  "She had been taking medication since being diagnosed with depression before Christmas.

"She told Mr Catermole she had taken the medication before but it had  'not really agreed with her'. "

"She thought the drugs might have been what made her feel unwell."

"Mr Catermole told the inquest her respiration rate was very high when he arrived but came down when he coached her breathing."


http://www.halifaxcourier.co.uk/news/Mother-in-asthma-attack-died.6314466.jp
http://web.archive.org/web/20131028000324/http://ssristories.com/show.php?item=4233

Mother in asthma attack died at 30

Published Date: 24 May 2010
A YOUNG mum died suddenly after suffering an asthma attack.
Rachael Vinning, of Spinners Hollow, Ripponden, was just 30 when she died at home in January 2009, an inquest at Halifax heard.
Her partner, Kenneth Simpson, had rung 999 earlier that evening when she collapsed in their bedroom.
But when paramedic James Catermole arrived, Ms Vinning was sitting up in bed, talking.
Mr Simpson said Ms Vinning suffered from asthma but very rarely had attacks.
She had been taking medication since being diagnosed with depression before Christmas.
She told Mr Catermole she had taken the medication before but it had "not really agreed with her".
She thought the drugs might have been what made her feel unwell.
Mr Catermole told the inquest her respiration rate was very high when he arrived but came down when he coached her breathing.
She was also initially complaining of pins and needles in both arms, but this subsided while he was there.
"I thought the patient had hyperventilated," he said.
The inquest heard that the oxygen in her blood was at 100 per cent, which would be unusual if she had suffered an asthma attack.
After around half an hour with Ms Vinning, and satisfied her symptoms had receded, Mr Catermole left.
But an ambulance had to be called for her again 20 minutes later when she suddenly stopped breathing.
Mr Simpson said: "She just seemed to have a blackout. I called 999 and took her out of bed and tried to do first aid. The operator was talking through what I should do." Despite paramedics' attempts at her home and at Calderdale Royal Hospital, Ms Vinning could not be revived.
Pathologist Dr Alan Padwell said the post mortem results suggested the cause of death was an acute asthma attack.
Recording that she died from natural causes, Coroner Roger Whittaker said because Ms Vinning was able to talk, her oxygen saturation was 100 per cent and her breathing rate reduced to a normal level just by coaching, there was no evidence for Mr Catermole that she had suffered an asthma attack when he was called.
He also said there was no evidence that if she had gone to hospital after collapsing the first time that she would not have died.



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